Life Sciences Day 5.0: May 2022

 

Check back for more information on Life Sciences Day 5.0!

Carleton hosted its fourth annual Life Sciences Day on Tuesday, April 6, 2021.

This multidisciplinary event brought together academic, government and industry sectors to build awareness of the important work encompassed by life sciences researchers at Carleton and provide a unique opportunity for attendees to network and explore partnership possibilities.

This year the event was held virtually and was open to the public.

 

Event Program

The Life Sciences Day 4.1 program included a keynote presentation, exciting panel discussions, and innovative research presentations by Carleton faculty members and individuals from the external research community. The 2021 program topics included:

  • Mental Health and the Pandemic
  • Medical Devices and Diagnostics

Poster Competition

On behalf of the Life Sciences Day organizing team, we would like to congratulate all participants and winners of the poster fair!

Graduate

First Place – IMPACTS OF TCDD ON HUMAN PANCREATIC ISLETS by Noa Gang

Second Place – THE BIOGENESIS AND MICRORNA TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF FREEZE-TOLERANT GREY TREE FROGS (HYLA VERSICOLOR) by W. Aline Ingelson-Filpula

Third Place – ROLE OF ARK5 KINASE IN REGULATION OF HNRNPA1 PROTEIN DURING CELLULAR STRESS by Krishna Bhattarai

Undergraduate

First Place – EUKARYOTIC INITIATION FACTOR 4E-BINDING PROTEINS MEDIATE THE ANTIDEPRESSANT RESPONSE TO KETAMINE IN MICE EXPOSED TO CHRONIC VARIABLE STRESS by Emily Arsenault

Second Place – SYSTEMATIC REVIEW ON THE SAFETY AND TOLERABILITY OF TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS by Neha Khanna

Third Place – AN EXPLORATION OF YOUTH PRIORITIES AND ROLES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COMMUNITY WELLNESS INITIATIVE: A STRENGTHS-BASED APPROACH FOR YOUTH RESILIENCE by Jyllenna Wilke

 

Life Sciences Day 3.0 Highlights Groundbreaking New Research

Human health doesn’t begin at birth – or even at conception. “The origins for health, development and disease trajectories occur even earlier than that,” says Kristin Connor, assistant professor in the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease in Carleton University’s Department of Health Sciences. That’s because parental health before and at conception, and during the early stages of pregnancy, can influence the health and development of a fetus and then the lifelong health of that individual after birth.

Connor shared her research at the Human-Microbe Interactions session of Life Sciences Day 3.0, an all-day event that brought together academia, government and entrepreneurs to share their work.

To read the full story, click here.